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concert program TWELFTH CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY 836w

TWELFTH CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY University of California, Berkeley A CONCERT OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC DERIVED FROM WORLD MUSIC TRADITIONS August 25 1:30 p.m. Hertz Hall

CHANGING PART Daniel Schmidt (1976) Performers to be announced.

ANGELS' ANGLES Craig Hazen (1976) David Roach - sitar Paul Dresher - guitar Craig Hazen - electronics

THIS SAME TEMPLE Paul Dresher (1976) Rae Imamura - piano Phil Aaberg - piano

Many of the present young generation of composers, including those represented in this concert, have taken their understanding of non-Western music to greater depths through direct study with master musicians and composers of other cultures. This has been facilitated by a number of factors, such as the great increase in such independent organizations as the American Society of the Eastern Arts and Musical Traditions, and inexpensive worldwide transportation enabling students to study the music in its cultural context.

There is no single approach taken by these composers in their adaptation of non-Western music. One may speak generally of new approaches to time and development, texture, polyphony, and polyrhythm. There are a multiplicity of influences involved in these works, including Javanese, North and South Indian, Balinese, West African, native American, and Chinese. This diverse field of influence is also reflected in the variety of instrumental media involved in conveying these ideas, such as electronic, traditional Western and non-Western, and composer-designed acoustic instruments. --Paul Dresher

CHANGING PARTS: For years I've been intrigued with structures which imply infinite processes. This piece does just that. It need never stop. The piece is influenced by Javanese Gamelan, and is played on percussion instruments of similar type. The originating tones, 2 and 1, are of low pitch. As the piece progresses, the tempo continuously slows, leaving a longer and longer time between tones. This is filled by tones of mid-range pitch. These are represented by the numbers shown here. Each line is repeated many times, until the tempo has slowed sufficiently to allow movement to the next line.

Parts which move faster than those written form ornamenting parts of middle and high range pitch. The low tones remain the important, all other parts forming patterns which lead toward them. Through this process, new layers of complexity are continuously revealed. --David W. Schmidt

ANGELS' ANGLES The score for each of the performers is a succession of angular constructs with a semi-circle centered on the vertex of a described arc. The arc can be of any degree (from 0-360) and the semi-circle can be one of six sizes (multiples of 60).

The arc determines the range and direction of scale movement. The semi-circle determines the amount of time allowed for that particular construct. An arc of 90 is one octave. The length of the blue arm of the arc determines amplitude. Direction is from the red arm towards the blue. Emphasis is placed on the gradual movement from one arc to the next. The scale used for improvisation is an even tempered representation of the Indian scale Todi, centered on C#.

Because of time limitations (only about 15 minutes have been allowed for the piece, when it would normally run about 30) this performance is more a sampling of what is conceived rather than an example in microcosm. I can only hope that it won't become too frantic.

This piece is basically an improvisation. All I have been able to do is describe some of the limits which have been placed on the performers. The rest is determined by what they can teach or learn from each other from moment to moment. --Craig Hazen

THIS SAME TEMPLE This composition is in a style called phase music or modal cyclic music. It uses only seven tones in a diatonic mode with the root sense constantly changing. This rather limited tone material is chosen because it allows the complex rhythmic and time manipulations, which are the primary concern of the composition, to be heard quite clearly.

The process of phasing, or cycling, in this case, is the simultaneous sounding of two or more short phrases (actually more like motives or riffs) of either different lengths, or of the same length but with different downbeats.

There are both rhythmic and melodic motives which operate separately and are combined with each other in various ways. The main rhythmic motives are cycles of 9, 7, and 5, with respective primary melodic motives from which most of the piece is drawn. These motives are used in various forms such as retrograde, inversion, augmentation, and diminution, and they are also played from all the degrees of the scale.

The overall process of the piece is one of building up, fragmentation, disintegration, and rebuilding. While all the material is precisely notated in conventional notation, and the order of events predetermined, the two pianists have improvisatory sections defined by the limits of the rhythmic and melodic motives. They may also choose to stay longer at particular points in the piece by repeating that particular cycle.

Typed by Cheryl Vega 6-12-95


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